Ever since the Rust All Hands, I’ve been experimenting with an alternative formulation of the Rust borrow checker. The goal is to find a formulation that overcomes some shortcomings of the current proposal while hopefully also being faster to compute. I have implemented a prototype for this analysis. It passes the full NLL test suite and also handles a few cases – such as #47680 – that the current NLL analysis cannot handle. However, the performance has a long way to go (it is currently slower than existing analysis). That said, I haven’t even begun to optimize yet, and I know I am doing some naive and inefficient things that can definitely be done better; so I am still optimistic we’ll be able to make big strides there.

Also, it was pointed out to me that yesterday, April 26, is the sixth “birthday” of the borrow check – it’s fun to look at my commit from that time, gives a good picture of what Rust was like then.12

End-users don’t have to care

The first thing to note is that this proposal makes no difference from the point of view of an end-user of Rust. That is, the borrow checker ought to work the same as it would have under the NLL proposal, more or less.

However, there are some subtle shifts in this proposal in terms of how the compiler thinks about your program, and that could potentially affect future language features.

Our first example

The analysis works on MIR, but I’m going to explain it in terms of simple Rust examples. Here is the first example, which I will call example A. The example should not compile, as you can see:

fn main() {
  let mut x: i32 = 22;
  let mut v: Vec<&i32> = vec![];
  let r: &mut Vec<&i32> = &mut v;
  let p: &i32 = &x; // 1. `x` is borrowed here to create `p`
  r.push(p);        // 2. `p` is stored into `v`, but through `r`
  x += 1;           // <-- Error! can't mutate `x` while borrowed
  take(v);          // 3. the reference to `x` is later used here
}

fn take<T>(p: T) { .. }

Regions are sets of loans

The biggest shift in this new approach is that when you have a type like &'a i32, the meaning of 'a changes:

  • In the system described in the NLL RFC, 'a – called a lifetime – ultimately corresponded to some portion of the source program or control-flow graph.
  • Under this proposal, 'a – which I will be calling a region3 – instead corresponds to a set of loans – that is, a set of borrow expressions, like &x or &mut v in Example A. The idea is that if a reference r has type &'a i32 then invalidating the terms of any of the loans in 'a would invalidate r.

Invalidating the terms of a loan means to perform an illegal access of the path borrowed by the loan. So for example if you have a mutable loan like r = &mut v, then you can only access the value v through the reference r. Accessing v directly in any way – read, write, or move – would invalidate the loan. For a shared loan like p = &x, reading through x (or p) is allowed, but writing or mutating x would invalidate the terms of the loan (and writing through p is also not possible).

The subtyping rules for references work a bit differently now that a region is a set of loans and not program points. Whereas with points, you can approximate a reference by shortening the lifetime, with sets of loans you can approximate by enlarging the set. In other words:

'a ⊆ 'b
------------------
&'a u32 <: &'b u32

In Rust syntax, 'a ⊆ 'b corresponds to the notation 'a: 'b, and that is what I will use for the rest of the post. We have traditionally called this an outlives relationship, but I am going to call it a subset relationship instead, as befits the new meaning of regions4.

To gain a better intuition for the idea of regions as sets of loans, consider this program:

let x = vec![1, 2];

let p: &'a i32 = if random() {
  &x[0] // Loan L0
} else {
  &x[1] // Loan L1
};

Here, the region 'a would correspond to the set {L0, L1}, since it may refer to data produced by the loan L0, but it may also refer to data from the loan L1.

Datalog

Throughout this post, I’m going to be defining the analysis by using Datalog rules. Datalog is – in some sense – a subset of Prolog designed for efficient execution. It basically corresponds to rules like this (using the syntax from the Souffle project):

.decl cfg_edge(P:point, Q:point)
.input cfg_edge

.decl reachable(P:point, Q:point)
reachable(P, Q) :- cfg_edge(P, Q).
reachable(P, R) :- reachable(P, Q), cfg_edge(Q, R).

As you can see here, Datalog programs define relations between things; here those relations are declared with .decl5. Some relations are inputs, declared with .input, which means that their values are given up-front by the user (these are also called facts). In this program, that is cfg_edge. Other relations, like reachable, are defined via rules which synthesize new things from those facts. As in Prolog, upper-case identifiers are variables, and whenever a variable appears twice, it must have the same value.

Note that, because it is a subset, Datalog avoids a lot of Prolog’s more ‘programming language’-like properties. For example, Datalog programs always terminate when executed on a finite set of facts (even when they recurse, like the one above). Also, it is fine to use negative reasoning in a Datalog program, as it disallows negative cycles – there are no subtle concerns about the distinction between “logical not” and “negation as failure”.6

To implement these rules, I’ve been using Frank McSherry’s awesome differential-dataflow crate. This has been a pretty great experience: once you get the hang of it, you can translate Datalog rules in a very straightforward way, which means that I’ve been able to rapidly prototype new designs in just an hour or two. Moreover, the resulting execution is quite fast (though I’ve not measured performance too much on the latest design).

Region variables

Now that we’ve described regions as sets of loans, I want you to throw all of that away. The analysis as I’ve defined it doesn’t directly manipulate those sets, at least not initially. Instead, it uses “region variables” to represent all the regions in the program. I’ll denote these as “numbered” regions like '0, '1, etc.

If we rewrite our program then to use these abstract regions (basically, to have a numbered region everywhere that MIR would have one), it looks like the following:

fn main() {
  let mut x: i32 = 22;
  let mut v: Vec<&'0 i32> = vec![];
  let r: &'1 mut Vec<&'2 i32> = &'3 mut v;
  let p: &'5 i32 = &'4 x;
  r.push(p);
  x += 1;
  take::<Vec<&'6 i32>>(v);
}

fn take<T>(p: T) { .. }

These abstract regions will appear through our datalog rules; I’ll denote them with R for “region”.

Relations between regions

The abstract regions we saw before don’t have any meaning just yet. What happens next is that we walk through and apply the type system rules in the standard way. This will result in “subset” relationships between regions, as we saw before. So for example consider the following line from Example A:

let p: &'5 i32 = &'4 x;

Here, the expression &'4 x produces a value of type &'4 i32. This type must be a subtype of the type of p, &'5 i32, so we get:

&'4 i32 <: &'5 i32

which in turn requires '4: '5. If we look at the program, we’ll see a number of subtype relationships emerge. I’ll write down each one along with the resulting subset relationships.

fn main() {
  let mut x: i32 = 22;

  let mut v: Vec<&'0 i32> = vec![];
  
  let r: &'1 mut Vec<&'2 i32> = &'3 mut v;
  // requires: &'3 mut Vec<&'0 i32> <: &'1 mut Vec<&'2 i32>
  //        => '3: '1, '0: '2, '2: '0

  let p: &'5 i32 = &'4 x;
  // requires: &'4 i32 <: &'5 i32
  //        => '4: '5

  r.push(p);
  // requires: &'5 i32 <: &'2 i32
  //        => '5: '2
  
  x += 1;

  take::<Vec<&'6 i32>>(v);
  // requires: Vec<&'0 i32> <: Vec<&'6 i32>
  //        => '0: '6
}

fn take<T>(p: T) { .. }

Ultimately, these subset relationships become input facts into the system. For reasons that will become clear later on, I call these the “base subset” relations:

.decl base_subset(R1:region, R2:region, P:point)
.input base_subset

In other words, base_subset(R1, R2, P) means R1: R2 was required to be true at the point P.

We’ll see in a second that this base_subset input is only the starting point – it tells you which relations were directly required to begin with, but it doesn’t tell you the full set of relations at any point; this is because the subset relations “accumulate” as you iterate, so you must ensure both the older relations and the newer ones. We’re going to define a more complete subset relation that includes both, but before we can get there, we have to look at how we define the control-flow graph.

Points in the control-flow graph

The control-flow graph used by this analysis is defined based on the MIR. We define the points in the flow-graph as follows:

Point = Start(Statement) | Mid(Statement)
Statement = BBi '/' j

Here, the Statement identifies a particular statement (the jth statement from the ith basic block). We then distinguish the start point of a statement from the mid point. The start point is basically “before it has done anything”, and the “mid point” is the place where the statement is executing. As such, all the base-subset relationships from the previous section are defined to occur at the mid-point of their corresponding statements.

We define the flow in the graph using a cfg_edge input:

.decl cfg_edge(P:point, Q:point)
.input cfg_edge

Naturally, every start point has an edge to its corresponding mid point. Mid points have an edge to the start of the next statement or, in the case of a terminator, to the start of the basic blocks that follow.

(For the most part, you can ignore mid-points for now, but they become very important later on as we integrate notions of liveness.)

Tracking subset relationships across the graph

Now we come to the most interesting part of the analysis: computing the subset relations. In the interest of building intuitions, I’m going to start by presenting a simpler form of this than the final analysis; then we’ll come back and make it a bit more complex.

The key idea here is that the analysis doesn’t directly compute the values of each region variable. Instead, it computes the subset relationships that have to hold between them at each point in the control-flow graph. These relationships are introduced by the “base subset” relationships that result from the type-check, but they are then propagated across control-flow edges, according to the following rule:

  • Once a base subset relationship is introduced between two regions 'a: 'b, it must remain true.

We can define this in datalog like so. We start with a relation subset:

.decl subset(R1:region, R2:region, P:point)

The idea is that if subset(R1, R2, P) is defined, then R1: R2 must hold at the point P. We can start with the “base subset” relations that are supplied by the type checker:

// Rule subset1
subset(R1, R2, P) :- base_subset(R1, R2, P).

Subset is transitive, so we can define that too:

// Rule subset2
subset(R1, R3, P) :- subset(R1, R2, P), subset(R2, R3, P).

Finally, we define a rule that propagates subset relationships across the control-flow graph edges:7

// Rule subset3 (version 1)
subset(R1, R2, Q) :- subset(R1, R2, P), cfg_edge(P, Q).

Easy peezy, lemon squeezy, as my daughter likes to say. If we apply these rules to our Example A, we wind up with the following subset relationships in between each statement (I’m only showing the relationships at each “start” point here, and I’m not showing the full transitive closure). Note that they just keep growing:

fn main() {
  let mut x: i32 = 22;
  
  // (none)

  let mut v: Vec<&'0 i32> = vec![];
  
  // (none)

  let r: &'1 mut Vec<&'2 i32> = &'3 mut v;

  // '3: '1, '0: '2, '2: '0

  let p: &'5 i32 = &'4 x;

  // '3: '1, '0: '2, '2: '0, '4: '5

  r.push(p);

  // '3: '1, '0: '2, '2: '0, '4: '5,
  // '5: '2,
  
  x += 1;

  // '3: '1, '0: '2, '2: '0, '4: '5,
  // '5: '2,

  take::<Vec<&'6 i32>>(v);

  // '3: '1, '0: '2, '2: '0, '4: '5,
  // '5: '2, '0: '6
}

fn take<T>(p: T) { .. }

Consider the final set of relationships. Based on this, we can see some interesting stuff. For example, we can see a relationship between the region '4 (that is, the region from the borrow of x) and the region '0 (that is, the region for the data in the vector v):

'4: '5: '2: '0

This is basically reflecting the flow of data in your program. If you think of each region as representing a “set of loans”, then this is saying that '0 (that is, the vector) may hold references that derived from that &x statement. This leads to our next piece of the analysis.

Borrow regions

So far, we introduced the subset relation that shows the relationships between region variables and showed how that can be extended to the control-flow graph. We’re going to do the same now for tracking which regions depend on which loans.

First off, we introduce a new input, called borrow_region:

.decl borrow_region(R:region, L:loan, P:point)
.input borrow_region

This input is defined for each borrow expression (e.g., &x or &mut v) in the program. It relates the region from the borrow to the abstract loan that is created. Here is Example A, annotated with the borrow-regions that are created at each point:

fn main() {
  let mut x: i32 = 22;
  let mut v: Vec<&'0 i32> = vec![];
  let r: &'1 mut Vec<&'2 i32> = &'3 mut v;
  // borrow_region('3, L0)
  let p: &'5 i32 = &'4 x;
  // borrow_region('4, L1)
  r.push(p);
  x += 1;
  take::<Vec<&'6 i32>>(v);
}

fn take<T>(p: T) { .. }

Like the base_subset relations, borrow_region are created at the mid-point of the corresponding borrow statement.

Live regions and loans

In normal compiler parlance, a variable X is live at some point P in the control-flow graph if its current value may be used later (more formally, if there is some path from P to Q, where Q uses X, and X is not assigned along that path).

We can make an analogous definition for regions: a region 'a is live at some point P if some reference with type &'a i32 may be dereferenced later. For the most part, this just means that there is a live variable X and that 'a appears in the type of X. There is however some subtleness about drops, since we try to be clever and understand which regions a destructor might use and which it will not (e.g., we know that a value of type Vec<&'a u32> will not access 'a when it is dropped). I’m not going into the details of how that works here, it’s the same as it was defined in the NLL RFC.

In terms of the Datalog, we can define an input region_live_at like so:

.decl region_live_at(R:region, P:point)
.input region_live_at

The initial values here are computed just as in the NLL RFC.

The “requires” relation

Now we can extend the borrow_region relation across the control-flow graph. As before, we introduce a new relation, called requires:

.decl requires(R:region, L:loan, P:point)

This can be read as

The region R requires the terms of the loan L to be enforced at the point P.

Or, to put another way:

If the terms of the loan L are violated at the point P, then the region R is invalidated.

(I don’t love the name “requires”, but I haven’t thought of a better one yet.)

The first rule says that the region for a borrow is always dependent on its corresponding loan:

// Rule requires1
requires(R, L, P) :- borrow_region(R, L, P).

The next rule says that if R1: R2, then R2 depends on any loans that R1 depends on:

// Rule requires2
requires(R2, L, P) :- requires(R1, L, P), subset(R1, R2, P).

Finally, we can propagate these requirements across control-flow edges, just as with subsets. But here, there is a twist:

// Rule requires3 (version 1)
requires(R, L, Q) :-
  requires(R, L, P),
  !killed(L, P),
  cfg_edge(P, Q).

This rule says that if the region R requires the loan L at P, then it also requires L at the successor Qso long as L is not “killed” at P. So what is this !killed(L, P) rule? The killed input relation is defined as follows:

.decl killed(L:loan, P:point)
.input killed

killed(L, P) is defined when the point P is an assignment that overwrites one of the references whose referent was borrowed in the loan L. Imagine you have something like this:

let p = 22;
let q = 44;
let x: &mut i32 = &mut p; // `x` points at `p`
let y = &mut *x; // Loan L0, `y` points at `p` too
// ...
x = &mut q; // `x` points at `q`; kills L0

Here, x initially referenced p, and that is copied into y. At this point (where we see ...), accessing *x is illegal, because y has borrowed it. But then x is reassigned to point at q instead – now accessing *x doesn’t alias *y anymore. This is reflected by killing the loan L0, thus indicating that y would no longer be invalidated by accessing *x.

We can now annotate Example A to include both the subset relations and the requires relations at each point. As before, I’m not going to show the full transitive closure of possibilities, but rather just the “base facts”. You can see that they continue to accumulate as we move through the program:

fn main() {
  let mut x: i32 = 22;
  
  // (none)

  let mut v: Vec<&'0 i32> = vec![];
  
  // (none)

  // Loan L0
  let r: &'1 mut Vec<&'2 i32> = &'3 mut v;

  // '3: '1, '0: '2, '2: '0
  // requires('3, L0)

  // Loan L1
  let p: &'5 i32 = &'4 x;

  // '3: '1, '0: '2, '2: '0, '4: '5
  // requires('3, L0)
  // requires('4, L1)

  r.push(p);

  // '3: '1, '0: '2, '2: '0, '4: '5,
  // '5: '2,
  // requires('3, L0)
  // requires('4, L1)
  
  x += 1;

  // '3: '1, '0: '2, '2: '0, '4: '5,
  // '5: '2,
  // requires('3, L0)
  // requires('4, L1)

  take::<Vec<&'6 i32>>(v);

  // '3: '1, '0: '2, '2: '0, '4: '5,
  // '5: '2, '0: '6
  // requires('3, L0)
  // requires('4, L1)
}

fn take<T>(p: T) { .. }

In particular, consider the set of facts that hold on entry to the x += 1 statement:

// '3: '1, '0: '2, '2: '0, '4: '5,
// '5: '2,
// requires('3, L0)
// requires('4, L1)

Note that the loan L1 is a shared borrow of x, and '4 requires L1. Moreover, the variable v holds references of type &'0 i32, and we can see that '4 is a subset of '0:

'4: '5: '2: '0

This implies that the references in the vector v would be invalidated by mutating x, since that would invalidate the terms of L1. Seeing as v is going to be used on the next line, that’s a problem – and that leads us to the final part of our rules, the definition of an error.

Defining an “error”

And now finally we can define what a borrow check error is. We define an input invalidates(P, L), which indicates that some access or action at the point P invalidates the terms of the loan L:

.decl invalidates(P:point, L:loan)
.input invalidates

Next, we extend the notion of liveness from regions to loans. A loan L is live at the point P if some live region R requires it:

.decl loan_live_at(R:region, P:point)

// Rule loan_live_at1
loan_live_at(L, P) :-
  region_live_at(R, P),
  requires(R, L, P).

Finally, it is an error if a point P invalidates a loan L while the loan L is live:

.decl error(P:point)

// Rule error1
error(P) :-
  invalidates(P, L),
  loan_live_at(L, P).

Refining constraint propagation with liveness

This is almost the analysis that I implemented, except for one point. We can refine the constraint propagation slightly by taking liveness into account, which allows us to accept a lot more programs. Consider this example, annotated with the key facts introduced at each point (remember, these facts propagate forward through control flow):

let x = 22;
let y = 44;
let mut p: &'0 i32 = &'1 x; // Loan L0
  // '1: '0
  // requires('1, L0)
p = &'3 y; // Loan L1
  // '3: '0
  // requires('3, L1)
x += 1;
  // invalidates(L0)
print(*p);

It would be nice if we could accept this program: although p initially refers to x, it is later re-assigned to refer to y, so by the time we execute x += 1 the loan could be released. However, under the rules I’ve given thus far, we would reject it, because we are steadily accumulating information. Therefore, at the point where we do x += 1, we can derive that requires('0, L0) quite trivially.

The problem arises because we re-assigned an existing variable p rather than declaring a new one. This re-uses the same region '0. We could therefore solve this by modifying the program to use a fresh variable:

let x = 22;
let y = 44;
let p: &'0 i32 = &'1 x;
let q: &'4 i32 = &'3 y;
x += 1;
print(*q);

But that’s not a very satisfying answer. Another possibility would be to rewrite using something like SSA form, which would basically automate that transformation above. That remains an option, but it’s not what I chose to do – among other things, variables in MIR are “places”, and using SSA form kind of complicates that. (That is, variables can be borrowed and assigned indirectly and so forth.)

What I did instead is to modify the rules that propagate subset and requires relations between points. Previously, those rules were defined to propagate indiscriminately. Now we modify them to only propagate relations for regions that are live at the successor point:

// Rule subset3 (version 2)
subset(R1, R2, Q) :-
  subset(R1, R2, P),
  cfg_edge(P, Q),
  region_live_at(R1, Q), // new 
  region_live_at(R2, Q). // new

// Rule requires3 (version 2)
requires(R, L, Q) :-
  requires(R, L, P),
  !killed(L, P),
  cfg_edge(P, Q),
  region_live_at(R, Q). // new

Using these rules, our original program is accepted. The key point is that on entry to the line p = &y, the variable p is dead (its value is about to be overwritten), and hence its region '0 is also dead. Therefore, the requires (and subset) constraints that affect it do not propagate forward.

This improvement is also crucial to accepting the example from #47680, which is rejected by the current NLL analysis:

struct Thing;

impl Thing {
  fn maybe_next(&mut self) -> Option<&mut Self> {
    ..
  }
}
    
fn main() {
  let mut temp = &mut Thing;
          
  loop {
    match temp.maybe_next() {
      Some(v) => { temp = v; }
      None => { }
    }
  }
}

Here, the problem is that temp.maybe_next() borrows *temp. This borrow is returned – sometimes – through the variable v, and then stored back into temp (replacing the value of temp). This means, if you trace it out, that indeed the borrow is live around the loop. You might think it would be “killed” because we reassigned temp (and indeed it should be), but with the current rules it was not, because when None was returned, temp was not reassigned. Basically the analysis was getting tripped up with the loop.

Under the new rules, however, we can see that – along the Some path – the loan gets killed, because temp is reassigned. Meanwhile – along the None path – the requires relation is dropped, because it is only associated with dead regions at that point. So the program is accepted.

Top-down vs bottom-up and causal computation

Of course, in a real compiler, knowing whether or not there are errors is not enough. We also need to be able to report the error nicely to the user. The NLL RFC proposed a technique for reporting errors that I called three-point form:

To the extent possible, we will try to explain all errors in terms of three points:

  • The point where the borrow occurred (B).
  • The point where the resulting reference is used (U).
  • An intervening point that might have invalidated the reference (A).

One of the intriguing byproducts of framing the analysis as a series of Datalog rules is that we can extract these three points by looking at the way we derived each error. That is, consider the error in Example A, where we had an illegal x += 1. If that increment occurred at the point P, we might have found the error by querying error(P). If we were using Prolog, which executes “top-down” (i.e., starting from the goal we trying to prove), then we might encounter a proof tree like this:

error(P) :-
  invalidates(P, L1),        // input fact
  loan_live_at(L1, P) :-     // rule loan_live_at1
    region_live_at('0, P),   // input fact
    requires('0, L1, P) :-   // rule requires2
      requires('4, L1, P) :- // rule requires3
        ...
      subset('4, '0, P) :-   // rule subset3
        ...

If you look over this tree, everything you need to know is in there. There is an error at point P because (a) P invalidates L1 and (b) L1 is live. L1 is live because '0 is live and '0 requires L1. '0 requires L1 because of '4… and so on. We just need to write some heuristics to decide what to extract out.

Traditionally, however, Datalog executes bottom-up – that is, it computes all the base facts, then the facts derived from those, and so on. This can be more efficient, but it can be wasteful if all those facts are not ultimately needed. There are techniques for combining top-down and bottom-up propagation (e.g., magic sets); there are also techniques for getting “explanations” out of Datalog – basically, a minimal set of facts that are needed to derive a given tuple (like error(P)). One such technique was even implemented and defined using differential-dataflow, which is great.

I’ve not really done much in this direction yet – I’m still trying to ensure this is the analysis we want – but it seems clear that if we go this way we should be able to get good error information out.

Questions?

I’ve opened an thread on the Rust internals board for discussion.

Thanks

I want to take a moment to say thanks to a few people and projects who influenced this idea. First off, Frank McSherry’s awesome differential-dataflow crate really did enable me to iterate a lot faster. Very good stuff.

Second, I have been wondering for some time why the compiler’s type system seemed to operate quite differently from a traditional alias analysis. Some time ago I had a very interesting conversation with Lionel Parreaux about an interesting alternative approach to Rust’s borrow checking, where regions were regular expressions over program paths; then later I was talking with Vytautas Astrauskas and Federico Poli at the Rust All Hands about their efforts to integrate Rust with the Viper static verifier, which required them to re-engineer alias relationships quite similar to the subset relation described here. Pondering these efforts, I re-read a number of the latest papers on alias analysis on large C programs. This, combined with a lot of experimentation and iteration, led me here. So thanks all!

Footnotes

  1. We were still using the alt and ret keywords, and not yet using => for match arms! Neat. And still kind of inscrutable to me.

  2. And macros were like #foo[..] instead of foo!(..). I remember pcwalton used to complain about “squashed spiders” all over the code.

  3. Region is the standard term from academia, so I am adopting it by default, but it doesn’t necessarily carry the right “intuitions” here. We should maybe fish about for a better term.

  4. Interestingly, this means that the type &'a u32 is covariant with respect to 'a, whereas before it was most naturally defined as contravariant – that is, subtypes correspond to smaller sets (but larger lifetimes). Again, not a thing that really matters to Rust users, but a nice property for those delving into the type system.

  5. These .foo directives are specific to souffle, as far as I know.

  6. We employ negation in these rules, but only in a particularly trivial way – negated inputs.

  7. This subset propagation rule is the rule that we are going to refine later.